20 août 2014 3 20 /08 /août /2014 15:36

For several years, Mai Tabakian has been developing a particularly innovative form of textile artwork thanks to a technique she created (and carefully kept secret). Geometric shapes – sometimes reminiscent of a certain mathematical rigor – bright and vividly astringent color compositions, carefully molded volumes and surfaces seem to emerge from a historical intermixing that spans from geometric abstraction to op art, from Orphism to Concrete Art (because "nothing is more concrete, more real than a line, a color, a surface", to quote Theo Van Doesburg), from Stilj to American abstraction – Sol Lewitt, Frank Stella, Ellsworth Kelly. We might also mention her more recent new pop, superflat play on colors and forms, Kusama’s colorful polka-dots… But everything in Mai Tabakian’s work is a personal step forward, a free getaway from these already beaten tracks.

For in her creations, at first glance deliberately decorative as well as visually highly desirable, beyond their padded aspect as recognizable as a signature, beyond those smooth, bright and plump shapes, and beyond those treasures of patterns, a sculptural – nearly architectural – dimension offers an unprecedented alternative not only to modern and contemporary art but also to the artwork currently being done with textiles. The artist has given life to ultimately intricate and complex objects, difficult to classify, neither paintings nor sculpture in the traditional sense, nor sewing, embroidery, or tapestry. Her work, constantly flirting with hybridity and mutation, is akin to a sort of "textile marquetry", since the fabric is embossed on extruded pieces of polystyrene. Brand new shapes and expressions emerge.

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

After a period of experimenting with painting-sculptures, focusing on flats and surfaces, Mai Tabakian’s work has taken flight, free in space, far from the notion of "painting", alternating between high-relief – with prominent, sculptured shapes standing out from the wall ("Trophées", 2013) – and installations ("Garden sweet garden", 2012-2013).

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

Generally speaking, Mai Tabakian draws the formal resources of her work from her interest in mathematical shapes and geometry, but also in all things biological and organic, in architecture, even in digital aesthetics ("Haïkus codes", 2011, takes up QR code aesthetics). The intersecting of these territories, their interactions, all governed by an organizational principle – a way of organizing the world – contributes to the hybridity of her work, calling upon other realms of thought and creation. The ties that are woven into, that are inherent in her productions, recall Goethe’s conception (1) of art evolving as an organic body, in the process of transformation and metamorphosis, possibly suggesting an origin common to art and nature.

It gives us the presentiment that through abstraction, a "life of shapes", narratives and myths is germinating. And when geometry joins with a figurative, sculptured form – an object, a flower, a mushroom – a tale, more profound than at first appears, may emerge.

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

Most of Mai Tabakian’s works give way to a delightful multitude of interpretations when we discover the titles, as, with a certain pleasure the artist cultivates ambiguity in what we can see or understand. Indeed, what can we say about the essence of her mysterious "Garden Sweet Garden": are these voracious flowers or poisonous mushrooms? Hallucinations or the psychotropic plants that produce them? Giant candies straight out of Roald Dahl’s hero Willy Wonka’s imagination? Or… sexual metaphors for a young girl’s dreams, like a Freudian delight? The multiplicity of potential interpretations, or their duplicity, referring to the intentions or frame of mind of the viewer, suggests the Freudian idea of an “unconscious meeting” between viewer and artist mediated by the artwork, a meeting that, like in love, precedes consciousness. In other words, by playing in the gaps between the explicit and the implicit, the intersections, reversals, doubts and ellipses, Mai Tabakian shuttles back and forth between the said and the unsaid, the symbol and the metaphor. This is particularly true of her “Cinderella” (2013), whose interlocking parts correspond to Bruno Bettelheim’s (2) psychoanalytical theories and the metaphorical meaning of the French “trouver chaussure à son pied” (to meet one’s match) better than to a target sport!

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

This is also true of the bulbous, spiked helmet of the soldier returned to civilian life "Retour à la vie civile" (2014), of the dumbbell assessing the weight of adultery ("Poids de l’adultère" 2013), both dual and light, and of her "Wubbies" (2012-2013), tender and gaily colored soft toys, which, despite their ingenuous or even childish appearance, express an obvious sensuality.

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

A scent of eroticism radiates from all of Mai Tabakian’s recent works, a sensuality embedded in the shapes that celebrate the union of masculine and feminine. But above and beyond the image of love in its most prosaic, her constant inspiration lies in the organic sciences, in physics – literally speaking (from the Greek φύσις, phusis : nature) – which lead her to ponder what governs human relationships, love, the quest for love, the fusion, interactions between people, the way affinities come to be. A questioning she already expressed in the series “Atomes crochus ou les affinités électives”– Chemistry or elective affinities (2011), referring both to the atomist theories of the ancient Greek philosophers Democritus and Lucretius, and later to the Latin Lucretius, as well as to Goethe’s "elective affinities" (3). As the artist explains: "This installation shows the analogy between the attractions that make and break couples and the chemical reactions that regulate the linking and the releasing of chemical substances. Affinities govern nature, generating effects on chemistry and living beings". Besides, doesn’t popular wisdom talk about the chemistry, or even the alchemy, of love?

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

The same questioning is reflected in "Trophées" (2013) – Trophies – an installation of high-relief sculptures made of exotic and strange halves of the same fruit: couples. It refers explicitly to the famous "Myth of Aristophanes", speech delivered by Aristophanes in Plato’s Banquet (4) and present in the popular saying "to find one’s missing half". Finding our lost, original other half in the limbo of the myth and the age-old story in order to (re)unite our primeval and ultimate nature is the meaning of the myth that gives Eros a particular dimension as “daimon”, go-between who puts back together what has been torn asunder. Incidentally, it is interesting to point out that Mai Tabakian precisely regards her work as a process of separation and "suture". "To build the work, one must first make a slit, an incision in the support before filling it in, sealing the wounds with the fabric", she explains.

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

But the forms she creates, particularly the phallic ones ‒ as in the series "Champion’s league" (2012) or "Les petits soldats" (toy soldiers, 2013) ‒ also spring from Mai Tabakian’s innate connection with Asian culture, especially with Vietnam where she is partly rooted. These works remind one of the “lingam” (5), erectile, standing stones, obvious phallic symbols that, sometimes enshrined in their female receptacle (the “yoni” – shapes also frequently associated in Mai Tabakian’s work), symbolize both Shiva’s physical and spiritual duality and the notion of the wholeness of the world. Thus, it is also from these embodied shapes and “signs” of Shiva, between the power of creation and the “place”, the host, that Mai draws many of her representations and the core meaning of her quest.

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

Mai Tabakian carries us far beyond a play on shapes and erotic allusions as might be our first impression. We come to understand that her approach relies in fine on a kind of quest for the “archè”, that which presides over the creation of things and beings, the principle that (to quote Jean-Pierre Vernant) "makes the duality, the multiplicity that lies in unity, manifest" (6), and that the artist, following the Greek tradition, places in what we would agree with her to call “Eros”, the force responsible for the creation and ordering of Chaos. Plato once again, who, in the Banquet identifies Eros "in the bodies of all animals, in the productions of the earth, in a word in all that is".

The struggle of Eros, fundamentally the vital force of creation, unity and wholeness, continues tirelessly against the forces of decay, destruction and death.

The Life of Shapes - text by Marie Deparis-Yafil

Thus, in her most recent works (the series "Aux âmes etc.", 2014 – To the souls etc.), Mai Tabakian challenges her knowledge of Buddhist temples and of the Vietnamese custom of domestic shrines dedicated to the cult of the family’s ancestors, to whom are owed thoughtfulness and gifts. "Aux âmes etc." fluctuates between a form of Vanity (implying a link with the dead), the funeral wreath and the offering.

It is then that what was underlying becomes more visible: the awareness of death and its relationship with the living, a sort of dread before the mystery of the organic and its inevitable destruction, the disquieting sense of the closeness between beauty and death, a feeling of being attracted and repelled at the same time.

Her artwork can therefore sometimes be regarded as a way to outstrip this fear through a process of reparation and transvaluation. As is often the case with artists working with textiles, notions of wounds and sutures come to the fore, exploiting the dual function of the fabric that both mends and protects. Here is the hand that inflicts – recreates – the wound, then nurses and seals it, smoothing over the gash. Next comes the catharsis that aims to “transcend the negative” thanks to a plastic and aesthetic expression that is soft, opaque and substantial, harmonious and mutable, abstract and suggestive, all at once aspiring and impenetrable. Turning ugliness and death into art. Converting what in organic life could be seen as impure and decaying, trying to make it beautiful and soothing, geometric and relieved of its “intestinal” quality, in a subtle crossfire between attraction and repulsion. By fighting against a cruelty we know little about but that we all experience deep down, Mai Tabakian mysteriously gives life to her intimate narrative.

Each piece of Mai Tabakian’s production is like a stone in the building of a temple, and, like those memorials in honor of the dead where one eats, sleeps and prays, they can all be seen as welcoming the visitor into a place of buoyant and spiritual serenity.

Marie Deparis-Yafil

1- J.W. Goethe, Metamorphosis of the Plants, 1790.

2- Bruno Bettelheim, The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales, 1976

3- Goethe is said to have extracted some references from Gelher’s Dictionary of Physics and the molecular exchange phenomenon, referring to the doctrine and works of Etienne-François Geoffroy in 1718, the mainstrean theory in eighteenth-century chemistry.

4- Tò sumpósion - Symposium, (190 b- 193 e), Plato, ca. 380 BC.

5- also meaning “the sign”, in Sanskrit.

6- Jean-Pierre Vernant, L’individu, la mort, l’amour. Soi-même et l’autre en Grèce ancienne, 1989.

Partager cet article
Repost0
Published by Mai
13 août 2014 3 13 /08 /août /2014 08:36
Say it with flowers - 21 november 2014 / 29 march 2015 - Museum Bellerive (Zürich)

"Flowers, it seems, are to be found almost everywhere – on glass, textiles, furniture, ceramics or posters. The Museum Bellerive traces the flower as a reoccurring design subject, starting with delightful objects from various disciplines and designers. Vases decorated with flowers by Emile Gallé and Max Laeuger or pieces of porcelain from Meissen reflect the preferences of different epochs, in much the same way as the ornamental wallpapers by William Morris. Fabrics from Fabric Frontline place a contemporary emphasis on botanical precision, those from Sonnhild Kestler on the use of folklore elements. The poster offers us an idea of the inexhaustible nature of flowers as a motif, it seems that they can be used to express – almost – anything. Positions of contemporary artists complete this floral bouquet."

Opening
Thursday, 20 November 2014, 7 pm

Opening times:

Tuesday to Sunday: 10am – 5pm
Thursdays until 8pm

Museum Bellerive - Höschgasse 3, CH-8008 Zürich / Phone: +41 43 446 44 69

>> More informations on: Museum Bellerive's website

Partager cet article
Repost0
Published by Mai
11 août 2014 1 11 /08 /août /2014 08:43
2014 - 45x45x39cm de haut - textiles divers sur polystyrène, peintures textiles

2014 - 45x45x39cm de haut - textiles divers sur polystyrène, peintures textiles

Aux âmes etc. (To the souls etc.) - n°1
Aux âmes etc. (To the souls etc.) - n°1
Partager cet article
Repost0
Published by Mai - dans Sculptures
10 août 2014 7 10 /08 /août /2014 10:09

Depuis plusieurs années, Mai Tabakian développe une œuvre textile particulièrement novatrice, dans une technique – gardée secrète ! - dont elle est l’initiatrice. Les formes géométriques -héritant parfois de la rigueur des mathématiques-, les compositions colorées, franches ou acidulées, le souci des volumes et des surfaces semblent résulter d’un brassage de références historiques, de l’abstraction géométrique à l’op art, de l’orphisme à l’art concret (parce que « rien n’est plus concret, plus réel, qu’une ligne, qu'une couleur, qu’une surface », comme dirait Theo van Doesburg), de Stilj, donc, à l’abstraction américaine – Sol Lewitt, Frank Stella, Ellsworth Kelly-. Plus près de nous, on pensera aussi, peut-être, aux jeux de couleurs et de formes du new pop superflat, aux rondeurs colorées de Kusama…Mais tout dans l’œuvre de Mai Tabakian laisse supposer un pas de côté, une fuite libre hors de ces sentiers déjà battus.

Car dans cette œuvre à la dimension a priori délibérément décorative, et plastiquement hautement désirable, au-delà de ce rendu matelassé, reconnaissable comme une signature, de ces formes à la fois lisses, brillantes, rebondies, de la richesse des motifs, la dimension sculpturale -voire architecturale- offre une alternative inédite, à la fois à ces entendus de l’histoire de l’art moderne et contemporain, mais aussi aux actuelles productions d’œuvres textiles. L’artiste construit des objets finalement complexes, résistants aux catégories, ni tableau ni sculpture au sens traditionnel du terme, ni couture ni broderie, ni tapisserie. Son travail, flirtant constamment avec l’hybride et la mutation, s’apparente presque à une sorte de « marqueterie textile », le tissu étant embossé sur des pièces de polystyrène extrudé. Ici émergent, assurément, des formes et des expressions nouvelles.

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

Après un premier temps d’expérimentation de tableaux-sculptures, privilégiant le plan et la surface, les plus récents travaux de Mai Tabakian prennent leur liberté dans l’espace, quittant la notion de « tableau », oscillant désormais le plus souvent du haut-relief, formes saillantes sculptées se détachant du mur (« Trophées », 2013), à l’installation (« Garden sweet garden », 2012-2013).

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

De manière générale, Mai Tabakian tire la richesse formelle de son travail de son intérêt pour les formes mathématiques et la géométrie, mais aussi pour le biologique et l’organique, pour l’architecture, ou encore pour l’esthétique numérique (les « Haïkus Codes », 2011, reprenant l’esthétique des QR codes). Les croisements de ces territoires, ces interactions, relevant toutes de principes d’organisation, de manière d’ordonner le monde, participent activement à cette dimension hybride de l’œuvre, faisant appel à d’autres domaines de la pensée et de la création. Les liens ainsi tissés, inhérents à la production de l’œuvre, renvoient d’une certaine façon à une conception goethienne[1] d’un art évoluant de manière organique, dans la transformation et la métamorphose, et, peut-être, d’une origine commune de l’art et de la nature.

Dès lors nous pressentons qu’au travers de l’abstraction, s’esquisse une « vie des formes », des récits, des mythes. Et lorsque le géométrique s’allie à une forme sculpturale figurative (objets, fleurs, champignons..) une histoire, plus profonde qu’il n’y paraît, peut naître.

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

La plupart des œuvres de Mai Tabakian ouvre à une réjouissante pluralité des interprétations, l’artiste entretenant à plaisir les ambigüités, tant dans ce qu’il nous est donné à voir qu’à comprendre, lorsque nous en découvrons les titres. Que dire, par exemple, de ce qui compose son mystérieux « Garden sweet garden » : s’agit-il de fleurs dévorantes, de champignons vénéneux ? De visions hallucinatoires ou de plantes psychotropes susceptibles de les provoquer ? De confiseries géantes dignes de l’imagination de Willy Wonka, le héros du conte de Road Dalh ? Ou bien…de métaphores sexuelles pour rêves de jeunes filles, comme un délice freudien? La multiplicité des interprétations possibles, si ce n’est leur duplicité, se rapportant donc à l’intention, à la disposition d’esprit de celui qui regarde, suggère par là même l’idée freudienne d’une « rencontre inconsciente » entre l’artiste et le regardeur, dont l’œuvre fait médiation, rencontre qui, comme dans la rencontre amoureuse, opèrerait en amont de la conscience… Autrement dit, jouant des écarts entre l’explicite et l’implicite, dans ses entre-deux, ses allers retours, ses retournements, ses doutes, ses ellipses, Mai Tabakian s’amuse autant du non-dit que du déclaratif, de la représentation symbolique comme de la métaphore. Ainsi de sa « Cinderella » (2013) dont l’emboitement des deux parties (« En plein dans le mille ») doit davantage à l’analyse psychanalytique de Bruno Bettelheim[2] et du sens métaphorique de l’expression « trouver chaussure à son pied » qu’au sport de cible à proprement parler !

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

Ainsi, de la turgescence de la pointe du casque de soldat de « Retour à la vie civile » (2014), de cet haltère mesurant le « Poids de l’adultère » (« Haltère adultère » 2013), duel et léger. Ainsi, enfin, de ces « Wubbies » (2012-2013), doudous tendres et colorés, qui, sous des allures faussement ingénues, voire enfantines, manifestent une sensualité évidente.

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

Un parfum d’érotisme affleure donc dans toute l’œuvre récente de Mai Tabakian, une sensualité, contenue dans ses formes, célébrant l’union du masculin et du féminin. Mais au-delà de la simple évocation de l’amour en son sens le plus prosaïque, c’est, dans une inspiration constante vers les sciences de l’organique, les sciences physiques au sens propre (du grec φύσις, phusis : la nature), que l’artiste s’interroge sur ce qui préside aux rapprochements humains, à l’amour, à la quête de l’amour, à la fusion, à l’interaction entre les personnes, à la manière dont se créent les affinités. Un questionnement qu’elle exprimait déjà dans la série « Atomes crochus ou les affinités électives » (2011), se référant à la fois aux théories atomistes des philosophes grecs, Démocrite, Epicure, puis plus tard du latin Lucrèce, et aux « affinités électives » de Goethe[3]. « Cette installation », explique l’artiste, « met en image l'analogie entre les attirances amoureuses qui font et défont les couples et les opérations chimiques qui règlent les liaisons et les précipitations des substances chimiques. L'affinité devient loi de la nature produisant aussi bien ses effets en chimie que chez les êtres vivants. » Le bon sens populaire ne parle-t-il pas d’ailleurs de chimie, voire d’alchimie amoureuse ?

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

C’est encore à ce type de questionnement que renvoie l’installation des « Trophées «(2013), ensemble de haut-reliefs de fruits exotiques et étranges en coupe, comme les deux moitiés d’un même fruit : un couple. Cette œuvre se rapporte explicitement au célèbre « mythe d’Aristophane », discours développé par le personnage d’Aristophane dans le Banquet[4] de Platon, et que le dicton populaire formule par l’expression « trouver sa moitié ». Retrouver sa moitié originelle perdue, dans les limbes du mythe et de l’histoire anté-séculaire, afin de (re)former l’unité primitive et ultime, tel est le sens de ce mythe qui donne à Eros une dimension particulière, celle d’un « daimon », intermédiaire liant ou reliant ce qui a été déchiré, séparé. Il est alors intéressant de noter, en parenthèse sur laquelle nous reviendrons, que Mai Tabakian voit son travail, précisément, comme un travail de séparation puis de « suture ». « Pour fabriquer l’œuvre » dit-elle, « il faut fendre, inciser le support pour ensuite remplir, colmater la blessure avec le tissu. »

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

Mais les formes que produit l’artiste, et notamment les formes phalliques que l’on retrouve, par exemple, dans la série « Champion’s League » (2012) ou encore « Les petits soldats» (2013), Mai Tabakian les fait émerger aussi et surtout depuis son rapport intime avec la culture asiatique, et en particulier avec le Vietnam dont elle tient une partie de ses origines. Ces œuvres évoquent les formes des « lingam »[5], pierres dressées et érectiles, symboles ouvertement phalliques qui, parfois enchâssés dans leur réceptacle féminin, le « yoni » -formes que l’on retrouve aussi fréquemment associées chez Mai Tabakian-, symbolisent à la fois la nature duelle de Shiva (physique et spirituelle) et la notion de totalité du monde. C’est donc également dans ces formes incarnées et « signes » de Shiva, entre puissance créatrice et « lieu », accueil, que Mai puise nombre de ses représentations, et le sens profond de sa recherche.

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

Elle nous emmène ainsi bien au-delà d’un simple jeu de formes et de sous-entendus érotiques tels que nous pouvons les comprendre au premier abord. Nous comprenons alors que sa démarche repose in fine sur une sorte de recherche de l’ « archè », de ce qui préside à la fondation même des choses et des êtres, d’un principe qui, pour reprendre les mots de Jean-Pierre Vernant, « rend manifeste la dualité, la multiplicité incluse dans l'unité »[6], principe que l’artiste, à l’instar de la tradition grecque, place dans ce que nous pourrions appeler avec elle « l’Eros », principe créateur et ordonnateur du chaos. C’est encore Platon, dans le Banquet, qui verra Eros « dans les corps de tous les animaux, dans les productions de la terre, en un mot, dans tous les êtres ».

Le combat d’Eros, fondamentalement puissance vitale, puissance de création, d’union et de totalité, se poursuit inlassablement contre les forces de la déliquescence, de la destruction et de la mort.

La vie des formes - texte de Marie Deparis-Yafil

Aussi, dans ses œuvres les plus récentes (la série « Aux âmes etc.»- 2014), Mai Tabakian s’est attelée à une réflexion liée à sa connaissance des temples bouddhiques ainsi que de la pratique culturelle vietnamienne des autels domestiques voué au culte des ancêtres familiaux, aux travers d’attention et de dons divers. « Aux âmes etc.» oscillent entre une forme de la vanité, engageant le lien avec les morts, la couronne mortuaire et l’offrande.

Emergent alors de manière plus visible ce qui était souvent sous-jacent dans son travail : une conscience de la mort et de son rapport au vivant, une sorte d’effroi devant le mystère de l’organique, comme devant l’indépassable de la destruction, le sentiment du lien étroit entre la beauté et la mort, dans sa dimension inquiétante et une relation d’attraction-répulsion.

L’œuvre peut alors être lue, parfois, comme une manière de mise à distance de l’effroi par l’acte de réparation, et par la transvaluation. Comme souvent chez les artistes qui travaillent autour du textile, les notions de blessure, et de suture sont manifestes, usant de la double fonction du tissu qui protège et répare. Voici donc le geste qui fabrique -revit- la blessure et qui la soigne, la colmate, rend lisse ce qui fut déchiré. Puis, s’exprime une démarche de l’ordre de la catharsis, en vue de transcender le négatif, les sources d’angoisse et d’effroi dans une expression plastique et esthétique douce, opaque et consistante, harmonieuse et mouvante, abstraite et suggestive, aspirante et impénétrable à la fois. Transformer la laideur et la mort en art. Retourner ce qui, dans l’organique, peut paraître impur et déliquescent, en essayant de rendre beau et apaisant ce même organique, qu’il se fasse géométrique ou qu’il soit délesté de sa dimension « intestinale », dans un subtil jeu d’entre-deux entre attraction et répulsion. Comme une forme de lutte contre une cruauté dont nous ne savons pas tout mais que nous connaissons tous, Mai Tabakian donne ainsi mystérieusement figure à son histoire intime.

Alors il se peut que chacune des œuvres de Mai Tabakian soit une pierre à l’édifice d’un temple et que, à l’image de ces lieux en hommage aux morts où l’on mange dort et prie, toutes puissent devenir pour nous des lieux d’accueil et de vie, dispensant une joyeuse et spirituelle sérénité.

Marie Deparis-Yafil

1- J.W. Goethe, La métamorphose des plantes, 1790

2-Bruno Bettelheim, Psychanalyse des contes de fées, 1976

3-Goethe ayant lui-même puisé, dit-on, dans le Dictionnaire de Physique de Gehler et le phénomène chimique d'échange moléculaire, renvoyant à la doctrine et aux travaux d’Etienne-François Geoffroy en 1718, théorie dominante dans la chimie du XVIIIe siècle.

4- Tò sumpósion - Le Banquet, (190 b- 193 e), Platon, env. -380 AVJC

5- signifiant aussi « le signe », en sanskrit लिङ्गं

6- Jean-Pierre Vernant, L’individu, la mort, l’amour. Soi-même et l’autre en Grèce ancienne, 1989

Partager cet article
Repost0
Published by Mai
10 août 2014 7 10 /08 /août /2014 07:07
2014 - 45x45x39cm de haut - textiles divers sur polystyrène, peintures textiles

2014 - 45x45x39cm de haut - textiles divers sur polystyrène, peintures textiles

Aux âmes etc. (To the souls etc.) - n°2
Partager cet article
Repost0
Published by Mai - dans Sculptures

 
// HOME //
// TEXTS / NEWS //
// PRESSBIO //

 

Contact